Thursday, April 23, 2020

Stock Market Investors Are Such Precious Little Souls



The world is falling apart from end to end and yet there is hope in the face of a down with no up in sight.

That circumstance could only occur in the day-room of an insane asylum or the American stock market—take your choice.

Let’s see now, a worldwide pandemic is every nation on the planet in a chokehold and we don’t know if—or when it might loosen its grip and whether millions or billions will die in the process. But that’s okay, because not every trader is dead yet and one man’s loss is another man’s gain. So a staggering Dow Jones decided to gain 400 points today.

Isn’t that just the cutest thing?


Small businesses are folding like chairs after a convention. Each hair salon, restaurant, neighborhood pub and bookshop that goes under takes the lifelong dream and most of the savings of someone you know. Twenty-six million Americans lost their jobs in five weeks and a landslide of bankruptcies, credit card delinquencies, defaulted student loans, auto repossessions and mortgage foreclosures are sure to follow.

And yet the markets are having serious conversations about when and how robust the recovery will be.

Excuse me?

The house is on fire and the investment community is having a debate over when or how or if they should decide to head for the door.

Meanwhile, our president is working the crowd like a stand-up comedian unsure of his audience.

But I guess it doesn’t much matter. On the brink of total national collapse, Joe Biden is the best we can come up with.

Those precious little souls in the stock-market, who fiddle with our money, can afford to take a little loss and make a little profit—because they know in their heart of hearts we will be there for them, as we always have been and always will be.

It’s our house that’s on fire, but we will build them a new house and quietly shuffle off to live under a bridge until they let us come out again to pick up the scraps.



1 comment:

  1. Hello Jim,
    Thanks for this thoughtful missive. I agree that it is rather strange for those involved with capital and investment to be having a discussion about anything but the overall health of the economy. With governments promising trillions (with a T) to stem the tide, I am not surprised that not a few are probably chomping at the bit to put this money to use, for a fee of course...

    ReplyDelete